Kirby Museum at Booth 1301 at SD:10

I’m heading to San Diego today, with the Kirby Museum setting up with scanner, Mother Box, stickers, postcards and friendly conversation at TwoMorrows’ Booth #1301.

Looking forward to seeing everyone; bring your original Kirby art to be scanned and included in the Original Art Digital Archive.

The Kirby Tribute panel is at 10am on Sunday.

Announcements, pictures, videos, tweets, who knows else, to come!

The House That Jack Built – Tom Kraft’s video slideshow

Tom Kraft, who made the video slideshow above, loaned many pieces of Kirby art to the Fumetto exhibit.

Have you seen Tom’s great What If Kirby website?

Fumetto Panel Discussion – Nadel, Gravett, Hoppe

I’ve posted the slightly-longer-than-an-hour Kirby discussion that Dan Nadel, Paul Gravett and I had last Saturday at Fumetto on Livestream.com. (If YouTube approves the Kirby Museum’s Non-Profit application, I’ll move the video there.)

I’d like to acknowledge and thank Greg Theakston for gifting his Kirby papers to the Kirby Museum – these papers were the source for the Street Code and the V-mail included in the Fumetto exhibit.

Having listened to the talk many times while preparing it for posting, I’m compelled to clarify and/or correct:

  • Many pre-code comics were not “for adults, not kid stuff,” they were all-ages. An important distinction.
  • Kirby’s wartime ailment was trenchfoot, not frostbite.
  • The Fourth World wasn’t only “expensive” considering the sales level, affidavit fraud by distributors contributed to the low sales levels used in that equation.
  • I should not have included Bob Powell along with Joe Orlando and Wally Wood regarding artists’ concerns about being paid for writing the comics via their pencil artwork.

That’s Tom Morehouse speaking from the audience a few times. Tom Kraft manned the video camera. The last question, about Kirby’s output, is asked by Fabrice Stroun.

Thanks again to Fumetto, Dan and Paul.

The House That Jack Built – Paul Gravett’s video tours

Four video tours shot and narrated by Paul Gravett, co-curator with Dan Nadel of this Jack Kirby exhibit mounted by Fumetto International Comix Festival, 2010. I’ve included all four in a YouTube playlist – they should play in sequence.

Largest Jack Kirby Original Art Exhibit to date at Lucerne’s Fumetto

The Fumetto International Comics Festival at Lucerne, Switzerland is mounting “Jack Kirby: The House That Jack Built”, the first major retrospective of original art by Jack Kirby. Over 150 works spanning from 1942 to 1985 will be on display from 1-9 May. Included will be all but two pages from “Whosoever Finds The Evil Eye!” (1966, Fantastic Four 54), the seven page “City of Ghouls!” (1954, Fighting American 2), the 22 page “Flower” (1973, Kamandi 6), the cover and 16 pages for “Good-Bye Broadway, Hello Death!” (1975, Our Fighting Forces 156) as well as rare sketches and key pages from throughout Kirby’s career.

2010 - Fumetto postcard

2010 – Fumetto postcard

The exhibit is curated by Dan Nadel and Paul Gravett.

Among those lending pieces from their collections are Kirby Museum members Tom Morehouse, Tom Kraft and Jonathan Ross.

The Kirby Museum is a proud supporter of Fumetto’s exhibit.

Jack Kirby’s The Romance Of Money replica mini-comic debuts at MoCCA

I’m pleased to be able to offer a replica of what could arguably be Jack Kirby’s first comic book, 1937’s “The Romance Of Money” as a new membership premium.

2010 - Romance Of Money minicomic

2010 – Romance Of Money minicomic

A panel feature that Kirby produced while working for H. T. Elmo at Lincoln Feature Syndicate, “The Romance Of Money” was not syndicated out to the many small newspapers that took Kirby and Lincoln’s other strips and editorial cartoons.

Instead, the panels were compiled into a booklet which was given out for free by banks. Just as the banks put a “house ad” on the back cover, I’ve taken the space to include some descriptive text.

There was also a 1947 edition of “The Romance Of Money” which featured red ink and fewer pages.

Thanks to Jerry McClanahan and Tom Morehouse for the scans.

Postcards debut at MoCCA

Two Jack Kirby postcards will debut at this weekend’s MoCCA Festival in NYC.

2010 - Postcards

2010 – Postcards

Chosen to highlight Kirby’s unique color sense, the 4″ by 6″ postcards feature Calpurnia from the 1969 Julius Caesar costume designs and “Stop the Panzers!”

 

The Kirby Museum will be at table D32. In addition to the postcards, we’ll be offering stickers, mini-comics, books, posters and portfolios.

For Sale: The Newsboy Legion by Simon & Kirby, Volume 1

DC Comics’ The Newsboy Legion by Joe Simon and Jack Kirby, Volume 1, offering covers and stories from 1942-1944, is now available for purchase in comic shops.

The cover here was provided by Harry Mendryk of the Simon & Kirby blog, who wrote about the book after having viewed it while visiting Joe Simon. Clicking on it will take you to the Simon & Kirby page of an Amazon Store set up by Bob Heer of the Kirby Comics Weblog – a percentage of purchases made through Bob’s Kirby and Other Comics Store will go to the Kirby Museum.

Bob’s also maintaining a New Kirby – Announcement page, with information regarding upcoming Kirby releases and information through 2004.

Jack Kirby Art Exhibit – Hunterdon Art Museum, Clinton, NJ 28 March – 16 May

“The Marvelous Art of Jack Kirby” will be exhibited by the Hunterdon Art Museum in Clinton, New Jersey from 28 March through 16 May 2010.

During the opening at 2pm on Sunday, 28 March, artist/instructor/collector (and Kirby Museum member) Charles David Viera will present a gallery talk where he will speak of the many contributions that Jack Kirby has made to American Pop Culture and offer insight to the artwork in the exhibition.

Below is a list of pieces being exhibited. The list is currently incomplete, though; some story page details need to be verified, a Fantastic Four page with ink art by Joe Sinnott is not included.

Stuntman: “Curtain Call for Death!” page 7, 1946
Story and script by Jack Kirby and Joe Simon. Pencil art by Jack Kirby. Ink art by Joe Simon and Jack Kirby. Lettering art by Howard Ferguson
First published: Stuntman Comics 2, June 1946 (Harvey Comics).

Bulls-Eye: “Grandma Tomahawk” page XX, 1954
Story and script by Jack Kirby and Joe Simon. Pencil art by Jack Kirby. Ink art by Joe Simon and Jack Kirby. Lettering art by Ben Oda.
First published: Bulls-Eye 5, April 1955 (Mainline Comics).

Sky Masters of the Space Force: “Mayday Shannon” strip 46, 1958
Story by Jack Kirby, Dick Wood and Dave Wood. Pencil Art by Jack Kirby. Ink art and lettering art by Wallace Wood.
First published: Sky Masters of the Space Force, 30 April 1959 (Adams Syndicate).

Two-Gun Kid: “The Outlaw” page XX, 1960
Story by Jack Kirby with Stan Lee. Pencil art by Jack Kirby. Script by Stan Lee. Ink art by Dick Ayers. Lettering art by XX.
First published: Two Gun Kid 55, August 1960 (Marvel Comics).

Fantastic Four: “The Micro-World of Doctor Doom!” page 12, 1963
Story by Jack Kirby with Stan Lee. Pencil art by Jack Kirby, Script by Stan Lee, Ink art by Dick Ayers. Lettering art by Artie Simek.
First published: Fantastic Four 16, July 1963 (Marvel Comics).

X-Men: “Enter, The Avengers” page 8, 1964
Story by Jack Kirby with Stan Lee. Pencil art by Jack Kirby, Script by Stan Lee, Ink art by Chic Stone. Lettering art by Sam Rosen.
First published: X-Men 9, January 1965 (Marvel Comics).

Thor: “The Grandeur and the Glory!” page 3, 1965
Story by Jack Kirby with Stan Lee. Pencil art by Jack Kirby, Script by Stan Lee, Ink art by Vince Colletta, Lettering art by Artie Simek.
First published: Journey Into Mystery 124, January 1966 (Marvel Comics).

Thor: “The Grandeur and the Glory!” page 5, 1965
Story by Jack Kirby with Stan Lee. Pencil art by Jack Kirby, Script by Stan Lee, Ink art by Vince Colletta, Lettering art by Artie Simek.
First published: Journey Into Mystery 124, 1966 (Marvel Comics).

Thor: “The Grandeur and the Glory!” page 11, 1965
Story by Jack Kirby with Stan Lee. Pencil art by Jack Kirby, Script by Stan Lee, Ink art by Vince Colletta, Lettering art by Artie Simek.
First published: Journey Into Mystery 124, 1966 (Marvel Comics).

Captain America: “The Secret!” page 6, 1966
Story by Jack Kirby with Stan Lee. Pencil art by Jack Kirby. Script by Stan Lee. Ink art by Frank Giacoia. Lettering art by Artie Simek.
First published: Tales of Suspense 86, February 1967 (Marvel Comics).

Captain America: “In The Name of Batroc!” page 7, 1968
Story by Jack Kirby with Stan Lee. Pencil art by Jack Kirby, Script by Stan Lee, Ink art by Dan Adkins. Lettering art by Sam Rosen.
First published: Captain America 105, September 1968 (Marvel Comics).

Forever People: “Super War” page XX, 1970
Story, script and pencil art by Jack Kirby. Ink art by Vince Colletta. Lettering art by John Costanza.
First published: Forever People 2, April 1971 (DC Comics).

Soul Love: “The Teacher!” page 6
Story, script and pencil art by Jack Kirby. Ink art by Vince Colletta. Lettering art by John Costanza.
Unpublished. Produced for Soul Love 1, 1971 (DC Comics).

Soul Love: “The Teacher!” page 7
Story, script and pencil art by Jack Kirby. Ink art by Vince Colletta. Lettering art by John Costanza.
Unpublished. Produced for Soul Love 1, 1971 (DC Comics).

Soul Love: “The Teacher!” page 8
Story, script and pencil art by Jack Kirby. Ink art by Vince Colletta. Lettering art by John Costanza.
Unpublished. Produced for Soul Love 1, 1971 (DC Comics).

In The Days of the Mob: “XX” page 6, 1971
Story, script and pencil art by Jack Kirby. Ink art and lettering art by Mike Royer.
Unpublished. Produced for In The Days of the Mob 2, 1972 (DC Comics).

Kamandi: “The Devil’s Arena” page 21, 1972
Story, script and pencil art by Jack Kirby. Ink art and lettering art by Mike Royer.
First published: Kamandi, The Last Boy on Earth 4, March 1973 (DC Comics)

The Eternals: “The Devil In New York” page 14, 1976
Story, script and pencil art by Jack Kirby. Ink art by John Verpoorten. Lettering art by John Costanza.
First published: The Eternals 3, September 1976 (Marvel Comics).

Machine Man: “Quick Trick” page 1, 1978
Story, script and pencil art by Jack Kirby. Ink art and lettering art by Mike Royer.
First published: Machine Man 6, September 1978 (Marvel Comics).

Superman & Challengers of the Unknown: “Give Me Power, Give Me Your World!” page 15, 1985.
Story and script by Bob Rozakis. Pencil art by Jack Kirby. Ink art by Greg Theakston. Lettering art by John Costanza.
First published: DC Comics Presents 84, August 1985 (DC Comics).

Additional events hosted by the Hunterdon Art Museum in conjunction with the exhibit:

1 – a lecture titled “Appreciation of Comic Art” presented by Joseph Mannarino on Saturday, 10 April at 12 noon.

2 – Doug Baron will teach a Beginner Comic Book Illustration Class for adults (16 and over) April 19-May 17. `

Hunterdon Art Museum on Google Maps

Kirby’s Hand-Lettered Street Code exhibited at MoCCA NYC 12 March – 30 May 2010

The Kirby Museum is pleased that a small version of Jack Kirby’s only solo-produced autobiographical story, “Street Code” (1983) is included in Keith Mayerson’s Neo-Integrity: Comics Edition exhibit at New York City’s MoCCA (Museum of Comic and Cartoon Art).

1983 - Street Code pages 1 & 2

1983 – Street Code pages 1 & 2

Neointegrity: Comics Edition is an exhibition curated by artist Keith Mayerson that includes over 210 cartoonists, illustrators, animators, and fine artists who work with the spirit and power of iconographic languages. With creators young and old, historic, currently famous, and soon-to-be-famous, the exhibition is also about the community and legacy of iconographic art and its ability to productively influence the world.

Originally conceived as a utopic attempt to begin an art movement, the first installment of the NeoIntegrity show was held in the summer of 2007 at Derek Eller Gallery in New York City. That show incorporated over 180 fine artists, with some cartoonists and illustrators mixed in to breach questions of high and low, rarified and pluralistic. NeoIntegrity: Comics Edition takes the proposal a step further, showing the relatability of creators harnessing the iconographic vehicle to express themselves and to tell stories for a culture to understand itself in order for it to become a better place.

MoCCA on Google Maps

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