Monthly Archives: May 2011

Lincoln, Lee, and Grant

Here’s some more interesting artwork I found searching the Kirby Museum site. Some rare historical work for Jack. Probably freelance work where he had to do a little photo research at the library. Most of the images look like standard portraits probably pulled from some reference book like an encyclopedia. 

Mister Machine

The Clarke/Kurbick/Kirby 2001 tale transitions into Mister Machine, aka Machine Man from 2001: A Space Odyssey# 10, the last issue of that short-lived series. B/W scan of the original art. Royer inks. Signed by Jack at the bottom.

Captain America Spread on One Artboard

Thanks to John S. for his comments on this post: Captain America Spread on One Artboard.

That Cap double-pager is a real mystery.  My best guess is that it’s an unused spread intended for pages 2 and 3 of Captain America #200.  I think Kirby often drew his two-pagers on a single sheet (which may have been cut in half afterwards), and if he decided, before sending it in, to replace it with the two pages that were ultimately used, that would account for the lack of any stamps or hand-written demarcations on the artwork.  I don’t see any traces of erased dialogue on it (which, if there, would confirm its origin as two pages intended for an actual story), but that could simply mean that Jack decided not to use it before he dialogued the sequence.  And I agree with your guess that he must have liked it enough to have Mike Royer ink it later as a stand-alone piece — as he also did with an unused double-page spread from the Silver Surfer graphic novel (although that one was clearly drawn on — or cut into – two separate sheets, as seen in The Art of Jack Kirby, where the inking on the unused pages was wrongly attributed to Joe Sinnott).

Here are the published pages from Captain America # 200 (Aug 1976).

2001 Treasury Part 3

Here are Jack’s xeroxes of the 2001 Treasury pages containing the color photographs I showed you yesterday. In the second scan I wonder if Jack had a problem with his photocopier, or maybe he was experimenting with the contrast to see how the image might look in black-and-white. The fourth scan features Jack’s notes on where to insert dialogue on the images.